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20120501
20120531
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
was the united states. the living room was mexico. walter cronkite was the ambassador to both countries. >> funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york. celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the colberg foundation, independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation, a john and holly guf charitable fund. the clement foundation, park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb albert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audrey rappaport foundation, the john d. and katherine t. mcarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org. and gumowitz, the hkh foundation, barbara g. fleishmann and by our sole corporate sponsor, mutual of america. designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we are your retirement company. >> welcome. there is no stretch of territory in the world quite like the
. and when they were questioned by that, they just pointed to the united states and said, "look what the united states is doing." you know, indefinite detention. the patriot act. you know, increase surveillance powers. "if the united states can do it, they certainly can't criticize us." and this happened in a number of countries. so, you know, we knew we had to look to ourselves in order to speak to the world. so we began to work with the aclu, pen did, to put together these public readings from these documents. >> you can't believe some of these documents that they've uncovered. and, you know, in a way it's a tribute to this country that the freedom of information act actually works. that you don't actually need wikileaks. like, there is an actual legal way that documents that are quite damaging to the people who committed these acts of atrocity. >> that's something that the book really chronicles is that this was not a case where everybody agreed with these programs. on the -- >> with the torture? >> right. >> you mean, people inside government? >> absolutely. >> there were dissent
the borderlands between the united states and mexico. a vast swath of terrain, a long and tortured history and an endless stream of humanity both separate and join our two countries. it's as complex a coupling as you will find anywhere. on the gulf of mexico, the border runs along the rio grande river to intersect with the continental divide where it turns toward tijuana and san diego on the pacific ocean. 1,969 miles snaking through desert and desolation. dividing towns and cities. marked now by stretches of steel and concrete fence, infrared cameras and sensors, natural guardsmen and border patrol agents. nearly 100 million people cross this border every year one way or another. one day in may, 11 years ago, 26 mexican men set out across the murderous stretch of desert known as the devil's highway. heading for arizona. and hopefully for work. 12 of them made it. 14 were scorched alive by the torrid sun. their story became a stunning work by the author luis alberto arraya. no one writes more tragically about the border culture than the son of a mexican father and anglo mother. born in tij
in that chain. but it's a struggle that goes beyond, you know, the borders of the united states. and that i see myself and my music standing shoulder to shoulder, in solidarity, with people, with the voiceless, the poor, the wretched, the people who don't have a chance to even reach that bottom rung of the ladder. and if my music can give them some voice, and if my songs can give some hope to their struggle, and that's been a good day at work. >> here in new york the other day, on may day, you led this group of guitarists. >> yeah. >> the guitarmy. as it was called. and you chose "world wide rebel songs" as the rallying cry. >> yeah. >> let's listen, because i want to know why you plucked that song from your arsenal. ♪ world wide rebel songs sing out loud all night long ♪ ♪ hang on man it won't be long world wide rebel songs ♪ ♪ from the hallowed pubs of ireland to nairobi's fallen slums ♪ ♪ in new york city open fire with the guitar, bass, and drums ♪ ♪ down in gaza down in fresno out your door and down streets ♪ ♪ are you gonna stand around? or are you gonna be free? ♪
guitar workers came to the united states looking for financial help. i offered to play a benefit show on their behalf. but the day before the benefit show, the earthquake in haiti happened. so these korean guitar workers, who had traveled 6,000 miles and were in desperate need for money for themselves, their families, and their strike fund, voted to donate 100% of the proceeds from their benefit show to the haiti relief effort. and i was very moved by that selfless act of international solidarity. that day, i wrote the song "world wide rebel songs," performed it that night, and became the staple, the cornerstone, of my most recent record of the same name. because their selfless act provides a window into the kind of world that i'd like to live in, the kind of world i'd like my children to inherit, the kind of world that i fight for in my music. >> here's the paradox you take me to, though. you sing, "hang on, man. it won't be long." there's something wonderfully promising about that, but also, terribly potentially disturbing. because you hang on and think, you know, you've been at thi
that's going overseas. we've got things that are plants in the united states that are owned by people overseas. we've got people in the united states who own things, but the plant is overseas. and in many of the big products that we assemble, automobiles, you've got parts coming from all over. so did the jobs all go overseas? or in a global economy, would some of it have gone overseas and some of it come here? now, once you make that inference, you can tell why the democratic response and the ad are both telling you a partial truth. some of that money did create jobs overseas, but some of that money created jobs here. the ad only tells you half. the democratic response only tells you half. but since you know the economy is global, you know there is some truth in both. >> it true, by the way, that fact checkers forced mitt romney to back away from his claim that he had net -- net increased jobs by 100,000 while he was running bain capital? >> yes. and when people say fact checking doesn't matter, here's a case study. fact checking often hits a brick wall. that is, the campaigns believe
to "get the hell out of the united states of america." apparently, he gets his talking points from fox news, rush limbaugh or the discredited rightwing rocker, ted nugent. but this time, i shook my head in disbelief. 78 to 81 democrats, members of the communist party? that's when the memory hole opened and a ghost slithered into the room. the specter stood there, watching the screen, a snickering smile on its stubbled face. and i did a double take. sure enough, it was the ghost of senator joseph mccarthy, the wisconsin farm boy who grew up beco one of the mo ntemptible thugs in amecan litics. >> there is that small, closely knit group of administration democrats who are now the complete prisoners, and under the complete domination of the bureaucratic communistic frankenstein which they themselves have created. they shouldn't be called democrats, they should be referred to properly as the commiecrat party. >> it was the early 1950s. the cold war had begun and americans were troubled by the viet union's rise as an atomic superpower. looking for a campaign issue, mccarthy seized on fear a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)

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